Finding A New Target

Finding A New Target

I had mentioned in a previous post that sometimes you need to come up with a fitness goal to make you stretch yourself. As always consult your doctor before beginning an exercise program, but I've joined the Spark People “5K Your Way program. Read about it here

Soda is Just Bad

That innocent-looking can of soda pop-no matter what it’s sweetened with-may be taking a toll on your immunity. Here’s why:
1. People who drink sodas instead of healthy beverages (think low-fat milk and pure fruit juice) are less likely to get adequate vitamin A, calcium, and magnesium. What’s more, soda contains phosphoric acid that depletes calcium and magnesium. These two nutrients help keep your immunity operating at peak efficiency.
2. Sodas containing high-fructose corn syrup also contain high levels of free radicals linked to tissue damage, the development of diabetes, and diabetic complications.
3. Plastic soda (and water) bottles contain a toxic chemical called bisphenol A (BPA) that can leach from bottles into soda…into you. Emerging evidence links BPA to a myriad of maladies, including immune system depression. Public health experts recommend that we protect children from exposure to products containing BPA-especially those they consume or use every day.
4. Diet soda actually contributes to weight gain. A study of 1,550 people concluded that people who drink diet soda have a 41 percent increased risk of being overweight or obese-for every can or bottle they drink per day! Turns out, any sweet taste signals body cells to store fat and carbohydrates, which makes you hungrier. Sweet tastes also promote insulin release, which blocks your body’s ability to burn fat. The hard truth: No published study has ever proven that drinking diet soda will help you lose weight.
From thatsfit.com
That innocent-looking can of soda pop-no matter what it’s sweetened with-may be taking a toll on your immunity. Here’s why:
1. People who drink sodas instead of healthy beverages (think low-fat milk and pure fruit juice) are less likely to get adequate vitamin A, calcium, and magnesium. What’s more, soda contains phosphoric acid that depletes calcium and magnesium. These two nutrients help keep your immunity operating at peak efficiency.
2. Sodas containing high-fructose corn syrup also contain high levels of free radicals linked to tissue damage, the development of diabetes, and diabetic complications.
3. Plastic soda (and water) bottles contain a toxic chemical called bisphenol A (BPA) that can leach from bottles into soda…into you. Emerging evidence links BPA to a myriad of maladies, including immune system depression. Public health experts recommend that we protect children from exposure to products containing BPA-especially those they consume or use every day.
4. Diet soda actually contributes to weight gain. A study of 1,550 people concluded that people who drink diet soda have a 41 percent increased risk of being overweight or obese-for every can or bottle they drink per day! Turns out, any sweet taste signals body cells to store fat and carbohydrates, which makes you hungrier. Sweet tastes also promote insulin release, which blocks your body’s ability to burn fat. The hard truth: No published study has ever proven that drinking diet soda will help you lose weight.
From
If you think you don't need to work out just because you're slim and trim at 25, think again. A new study shows that people who start a regular fitness regimen in their 20s and stick with it into their 30s and 40s experience less middle age spread.

Exercising in Your 20's Helps You Later

The study, published in the latest issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, found that starting exercise early in life is especially good for women. Women who maintain a high intensity, regular fitness routine from their 20s onward gain 13 fewer pounds than women who are inactive or who are inconsistent in their exercise routines.

The new research comes out of Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine and was headed by Dr. Arlene Hankinson, instructor of preventive medicine. Her team's research followed the exercise patterns of more than 3,500 men and women, ages 18 to 30 at baseline, over the course of 20 years.

For the purposes of the study, Hankinson told AOL Health her team defined “high intensity” exercise as exercise of high frequency and duration for at least 150 minutes per week, which is in keeping with federal guidelines for exercising at least 30 minutes five days a week. “We found that 25 minutes of exercise every day is better at maintaining weight than 45 minutes a day once in awhile,” Hankinson said.

So what if you're 35 or 45 and you've never engaged in regular exercise? Is it too late to start to see a benefit? Hankinson said that while her study only looked at people who started exercising in young adulthood, she would certainly encourage anyone of any age to get moving. “It's not that there are fewer benefits of activity when you start late,” she explains. “It's that the amount of activity you have to do may increase

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